Waterproofing integrity on decks with high deflections

Figure-4There is a general rule that surfaces which support brittle materials, like ceramic tiles, be kept within a deflection limit of 1:500. With decks that are exposed to extremes of temperature movement, this deflection limit becomes critical as the location of movement joints in tiling given in AS 3958.1 – 2007 ‘Ceramic Tiles – Guide to the installation of ceramic tiles’ of 4.5 linear metres is based on the surface supporting the tiles being limited to this defection limit. Having deflections that are greater than this limit will cause increase in the shear stresses in the material between the tiles and the supporting substrate. When tiles are directly adhered onto a substrate with inbuilt falls these shear stresses are most critical. Any increase in these stresses due to deflection of the deck can result in a failure of the adhesion and lead to failures within the waterproofing membrane. Read more from Barry Schafer…

Coloured Grout – managing colour perception and consistency

GreyGlamourBathroomLong gone are the days when the tiler only offered White, Off-white or Grey as the only colour options for grout. He would have a proprietary white wall grout and / or site mix local sand with the three colours of cement for floor grouting. If he was a stone fixer he might have added some pigment to keep some of the more demanding customers happy. Tiles were not as much a fashion item as they are today and choice of style and colour was very limited. Read more…

Impact resistance of ceramic surfaces

tile-impactCeramic tiles are materials that make up a flooring system. Generally, they have low fracture toughness and when objects fall on them, they can suffer surface damage with possible loss of material. The degree and type of damage are the result of a complex system of factors, including tile installation, nature and geometry of the impinging material, magnitude of the stress generated by the impact, hardness of the glaze and of the material making up the falling object, the angle of impact, fall height and mass of the impinging object, bond strength and resistance in the engobe–glaze and engobe–substrate interfaces. Read more from this paper…